Vagus nerve - Whats all the fuse about?

Updated: Jul 31

Why is the vagus nerve so important? and what is it...?

What is the Vagus Nerve? The vagus nerve is our X nerve or 10th cranial nerve - named Vagus because it “wanders” like a 'vagabond' in the body, sending out sensory fibers from your brainstem to your visceral organs. The vagus nerve, is the longest of the cranial nerves, controls your inner nerve center—the parasympathetic nervous system. And it oversees a vast range of crucial functions, communicating motor and sensory impulses to every organ in your body. I believe it is the missing link to the treatment of chronic inflammation.


The nerve starts in our brainstem, just behind the ears travelling down each side of the neck, across the chest and to our abdomen. It is our INNER HIGHWAY - brain to stomach and , the lungs, heart, spleen, intestines, liver and kidneys, as well as nerves for in speech, eye contact, facial expressions and even your ability to tune in to other people’s voices. The nerve operates far below the level of our conscious minds. A Vital part of the parasympathetic nervous system.


One of the vagus nerve’s jobs is to reset the immune system and switch off production of proteins that fuel inflammation. Low vagal tone means this regulation is less effective and inflammation can become excessive.

Research shows that a high vagal tone makes your body better at regulating blood glucose levels, reducing the likelihood of diabetes, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Low vagal tone, however, has been associated with chronic inflammation. As part of the immune system, inflammation has a useful role helping the body to heal after an injury, for example, but it can damage organs and blood vessels if it persists when it is not needed.

With this in mind new clinical trials have been conducted to show how controlling the vagus nerve through electro implants which intercept signals between the organs and the brain can potentially tell the spleen to switch off production of a particular inflammatory proteins.


One clinical trial - displayed how controlling the vagus nerve through electro implants which intercept signals between the organs and the brain can potentially communicate the spleen to switch off the production of inflammatory proteins. One of the vagus nerve’s roles is to reset the immune system and switch off the production of proteins that fuel inflammation. The implant disrupts the pathways and regulates them back to homeostasis. Basically they found an off switch for inflammation! Thus artificially turning off our fight and flight response resulting in lower levels of inflammation. In the trial trial; patients with rheumatoid arthritis were given a magnet to swipe across their throat, activating the implant and stimulating the vagus nerve. This would reduce the inflammatory response in their spleen. Several of the patients experienced a remarkable recovery, one stating; “Within a few weeks, I was in a great condition,” she says. “I could walk again and cycle, I started ice-skating again and got back to my gymnastics.” (new scientist, 2016). Research paper, see https://www.pnas.org/content/113/29/8284.

If manually switching the vagus nerve off (with a switch) or 'stand down' - this is confirmation that the fight or flight response can cause both havoc or ‘miracle’ cures in the body. Our brain can naturally correct its ‘stuck’ patterns and we not all require an electronic implant to perform cures.

Want to know ways to support our vagal tone? Here is a couple
  • Singing

  • Humming

  • Yoga

  • Cold showers

  • Laughter

  • Intermittent fasting

  • Sea food

  • Zinc or Probiotics

click here for more ideas


For more information on how homeopathy can support you turning the modern day 'switch off' and returning to a state of balance and repair. Do get in touch via my website or email kirstin.bruges@hotmail.com

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black LinkedIn Icon